First off, I don’t like working with video mainly because I don’t understand all the parameters and whatnot. So asking me to add video to your website is like asking me to change your car’s oil; I can do it but it might get a little messy.

A client contacted me requesting that I add a flash video (SWF) to their website. Sounds easy enough, right? Technically, adding the file to the website IS the easy part; it’s making sure it’s the right format, file size, and encoding is the tricky part (at least for me).

I was given a Quicktime (.mov) file that was encoded using Linear PCM, Apple ProRes 422 (Proxy). I had no idea what this type of encoding was. No matter what I tried (downloading programs to convert their .mov file to a .flv file, trying to embed the .mov file itself, etc) I could not get this video to automatically play correctly in a browser.

After some thinking, I decided to research what Linear PCM, Apple ProRes 422 (Proxy) was, since I had never heard of this particular coding. I don’t know what happened but I ended up encoding it with H.264 and voila! It was able to be added to Adobe’s Flash and published to a .swf for simple embedding.

If you’re anything like me, you love keeping track of past projects so that you can dig them up when you need to remember what you did 2 years ago. So, in my attempt to help others out, this is me taking note of what I did.

1) Checked the encoding which was Linear PCM, Apple ProRes 422 (Proxy).
2) Changed encoding to H.264 using Adobe Media Encoder
3) Added .mp4 (h.264 final format) to Adobe Flash CS6
4) Published video
5) Added <object><embed> code to HTML (and uploaded files to proper directories)
6) Sat back and enjoyed my 8+ research figuring out why converting a .mov to .swf was so difficult

Here’s the final code to embed your .swf into an HTML document (below).

Remember to change filenames/paths to files: